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The subjective and objective effects of tinted spectacle lenses on visual performance

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dc.contributor.advisor Prof. J.T. Ferreira en_US
dc.contributor.author Moore, Linda A.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-08-17T05:43:45Z
dc.date.available 2012-08-17T05:43:45Z
dc.date.issued 2012-08-17
dc.date.submitted 1997-12
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10210/6056
dc.description M.Phil. en_US
dc.description.abstract Tinted spectacle lenses have long been worn to provide ocular protection from harmful electromagnetic radiation during recreational activities. Controversy exists surrounding the colour of the spectacle tints and the environmental conditions under which these tints are worn. There is little scientific evidence to substantiate the many opinions of authors on the effects of tinted spectacle lenses on visual skills and, ultimately, on overall performance in recreational situations. This study serves to provide scientific data concerning the effects of tinted lenses on static visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, colour vision, stereopsis and visual evoked potential (VEP). These results are related to the visible spectrum transmission curve for each experimental lens. recommendations are then made concerning the environmental conditions under which each lens tint should be worn. The HOYA ULT-2000 Light Transmission Metre was used to establish the percentage of visible light being transmitted through each of the experimental lenses. The DMS 80/90 Visible Spectrophotometer was used to generate a visible spectrum transmission curve for each of the 8 experimental lenses used in this study. 30 subjects (Group A) were randomly selected from the RAU student population for the assessment of the effects of tinted lenses static visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, colour vision and stereopsis. 10 students (Group B) were then randomly selected from the RAU student population for the assessment of the effects of tinted experimental lenses on visual evoked potential (VEP). The ametropic subjects in Groups A and B all wore their habitual spectacle or contact lens corrections throughout the testing procedure. The following lens tint colours were used: clear, black, grey, yellow, green, blue, red and pink. The subjects were evaluated binocularly without any tinted lens being worn, then through each of the 8 tinted experimental lenses (randomly presented). Results of the visual skills and VEP testing were analysed as follows: Group A: An average score was calculated for the results achieved on the static visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, colour vision and stereopsis tests when no experimental lenses were worn. This average was then compared to the average static visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, colour vision and stereopsis scores for each of the 8 experimental lenses. Group B: An average score was calculated for each of the amplitude and latency components of the VEP waveforms generated when no experimental lenses are worn. This average was then compared to the average amplitude and latency components generated when each of the 8 experimental lenses (as for Group A) are worn. Static visual acuity was assessed using a Snellen visual acuity letter chart at 6m. Contrast sensitivity was assessed using a Vistech VCTS 6500 Contrast Sensitivity Chart at 3m. Colour vision assessment was performed using the lshihara Colour Vision Test and the City University Colour Vision Test. The Random Dot Near Stereo Test was used to assess stereopsis. The Nicolet Pathfinder II was used to assess visual evoked potentials (VEPs). The results of this study show that the black, grey, yellow, green, blue, red and pink tinted lenses have a statistically significant influence on visual efficiency only when subjective methods (i.e. static visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, colour -vision and stereopsis) of visual efficiency assessment are used. The tinted lenses had little effect on visual efficiency when an objective means (i.e. VEP) of assessment was used, as there were no statistically significant differences between the lenses. The results of this research project indicate that the colour of the lens tint has little real effect on visual efficiency, when measured objectively. The effect of the lens tint is shown to be highly subjective. Tinted lens selection would therefore be based on personal preference and the amount of protection that the lens provides from harmful electromagnetic radiation. It can be concluded that no single lens tint is therefore suitable for all individuals under the same environmental conditions. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Eye -- Protection en_US
dc.subject Ophthalmic lenses en_US
dc.subject Visual acuity en_US
dc.title The subjective and objective effects of tinted spectacle lenses on visual performance en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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