The perceptions of employment equity and black economic empowerment as predictors of union commitment.

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dc.contributor.author Janse van Rensburg, K.
dc.contributor.author Roodt, G.
dc.date.accessioned 2008-10-09T09:45:02Z
dc.date.available 2008-10-09T09:45:02Z
dc.date.issued 2005
dc.identifier.citation 31(1), 55-64. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10210/1126
dc.description.abstract The purpose of the study was to test whether the perceptions of employment equity (EE) and black economic empowerment (BEE) are related to union commitment and whether the perceptions about the mentor’s role significantly mediate this said relationship. The sampling frame for the study constituted 1200 employees of a division of a large public transport organisation and a convenience sample including all 1200 employees yielded 637 fully completed records (a 53% response rate). The results of the study indicate that the perceptions of EE and BEE are significantly related to union commitment, but that perceptions of the mentor’s role do not mediate this relationship. More detailed findings on the study are reported. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher SA Journal of Industrial Psychology en
dc.rights Complies with the rights as specified by the publisher: http://www.sajip.co.za/ & Copyright University of Johannesburg en
dc.subject Employment equity en
dc.subject Black economic empowerment en
dc.subject Union commitment en
dc.subject BEE en
dc.subject EE en
dc.title The perceptions of employment equity and black economic empowerment as predictors of union commitment. en
dc.type Article en

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