Comparing fairness perceptions of personnel selection techniques of American, French and South African job applicants.

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dc.contributor.author Visser, D.
dc.contributor.author De Jong, A.
dc.date.accessioned 2009-08-05T10:06:52Z
dc.date.available 2009-08-05T10:06:52Z
dc.date.issued 2001
dc.identifier.citation 27(2), 62-68. en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10210/2940
dc.description.abstract The purpose of the study was to determine whether job applicants' perceptions of commonly used selection procedures vary across nationalities, because a negative impression of prospective employers that use selection techniques that are viewed as unfair, may result. In this study the fairness perceptions of 179 South African employees were compared with results obtained with 142 American and 117 French participants with regard to ten selection techniques using the framework of organisational justice theory. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Journal of Industrial Psychology en
dc.rights Complies with the rights as specified by the publisher: http://www.sajip.co.za/ & Copyright University of Johannesburg en
dc.subject Job applicants en
dc.subject Fairness perceptions en
dc.subject Organisational justice theory en
dc.title Comparing fairness perceptions of personnel selection techniques of American, French and South African job applicants. en
dc.type Article en

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