Investigating the perceptions of homoeopathy of Presbyterian and Methodist trainee ministers, ministers and congregants in South Africa

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dc.contributor.advisor Dr. R. Razlog Dr. D. Forster en
dc.contributor.author Snyman, Nadene
dc.date.accessioned 2010-03-31T07:04:30Z
dc.date.available 2010-03-31T07:04:30Z
dc.date.issued 2010-03-31T07:04:30Z
dc.date.submitted 2009
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10210/3124
dc.description M. Tech. en
dc.description.abstract The Census of 2001 (Statistics South Africa, 2001b) estimates that 80% of the South African population categorises themselves as Christian. Homoeopathy is part of the multibillion rand alternative and complementary health industry (Health Products Association of Southern Africa, 2008). However, there are concerns within the Christian community about whether or not Homoeopathy is an acceptable healing modality for Christians. This is in part due to negative perceptions of Homoeopathy often encouraged by Christian authors such as Brown (n.d.) Dick (n.d.) and Barrett (2004). The study sought to investigate the perceptions of South African Christians about Homoeopathy. Specifically it looked at the Presbyterian and Methodist Christians in Gauteng, which accounts for 9.8% of Christians in Gauteng (Statistics South Africa, 2001b). The particular areas of investigation were the perceived spirituality underlying Homoeopathy, Homoeopathy’s origins, the training of Homoeopaths and lastly the principles of Homoeopathy. A questionnaire survey was conducted in the Presbyterian and Methodist Churches in Gauteng. The information sheets and questionnaire were distributed at a variety of church meetings. The questionnaire was divided into three sections, Section A was background questions, Section B was questions related to personal perceptions and attitudes, and lastly, Section C was an optional free open-ended question. It was proposed that one hundred and eighty questionnaires be completed; one hundred and seventy seven were used for the analysis. The sample consisted of Ordained Ministers, Trainee Ministers and Congregants. The questionnaires were analysed by STATKON using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences for Windows (SPSS). The statistics were descriptive and comparisons between groups were made using multi-variant techniques. Section A was analysed by frequencies, Section B was divided into four factors each dealing with a specific aspect of Homoeopathy, namely; the perceived spirituality underlying Homoeopathy, the origins of Homoeopathy, the training of Homoeopaths and lastly the principles of Homoeopathy. Section C was an open-ended / optional question divided into negative comments, Neutral / I Do Not Know and positive comments made by the participants. The Presbyterian sample was compared to the Methodist sample. There was no personal identifying data on the questionnaires, this allowed for complete anonymity of all participants. The participants gave consent to participate in the study by filling in the questionnaire. The results showed that for Factors one, two and three in the Presbyterian and Methodist samples, the perception about the spirituality underlying Homoeopathy, the origins of Homoeopathy and the training of Homoeopaths were all positive. Factor four, the principles of Homoeopathy, showed a negative perception in all sample groups except, the Presbyterian Trainee Minister group that showed a perception of Neutral / I Do Not Know. There were no statistically significant differences between the Presbyterian and Methodist Churches. However, there were statistically significant differences within the sample groups in the Methodist Church, even though their perceptions were all positive perceptions, the Trainee Minister group showed a greater inclination to a perception of Neutral / I Do Not Know. It would be helpful to continue this research into the wider Christian community and to extend it across all the provinces in South Africa. It was evident from the study that there is a great need for educating the Christian community about Homoeopathy and engaging in a comprehensive marketing programme. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Homeopathy en
dc.subject Christians' health and hygiene en
dc.title Investigating the perceptions of homoeopathy of Presbyterian and Methodist trainee ministers, ministers and congregants in South Africa en
dc.type Thesis en

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