The relationship between career maturity and career decision-making self-efficacy expectations among disadvantaged learners

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dc.contributor.advisor Dr. G.P. de Bruin en
dc.contributor.author Bernard-Phera, Martha Joy
dc.date.accessioned 2010-11-23T05:44:56Z
dc.date.available 2010-11-23T05:44:56Z
dc.date.issued 2010-11-23T05:44:56Z
dc.date.submitted 2000-06
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10210/3530
dc.description M.A. en
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between career maturity and career decision-making self-efficacy expectations among disadvantaged Grade 12 students. Factor analysis was used for this purpose. The construct of career maturity was dealt with comprehensively by means of a theoretical review of the contributions made by Donald Super, John Crites and Ronelle Langley. The second construct, i.e., career decision-making self-efficacy expectations was covered by reviewing the contributions of Albert Bandura, Nancy Betz, Steven Brown, Gail Hackett and Robert Lent. Three measurement instruments were utilised, namely, the Biographical Questionnaire, the Career Development Questionnaire (CDQ) and the Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale (CDMSES). The data was analysed by means of principal factor analysis with iterated communalities. The Scree-test and eigenvalues-greater-than-one criterion were used to determine the number of factors. The factors were obliquely rotated according to the Promax criterion. The factor analysis revealed that career maturity and career decisionmaking self-efficacy expectations are two distinguishable but empirically and conceptually related constructs. Although the CDQ and CDMSES and their respective sub-scales define two separate factors, the correlation between the factors show that they are not entirely independent. Factor analysis also revealed that the CDQ and CDMSES were valid and reliable measures of career maturity and career decision-making selfefficacy for a sample other than the white, middle-class samples. The results also show that the disadvantaged learner has a lower level of career maturity and career decision-making self-efficacy as compared to a normative high school sample and an affluent sample. These results were expected, especially in the light of South Africa's historical past. Changes in the economic environment may prove to be instrumental in changing perceptions about the world of work and attitudes towards career planning and choice. Researchers are challenged to implement programmes that will assist in the enhancement of career maturity and career decision-making self-efficacy ofthe disadvantaged learner. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Career development en
dc.subject Adulthood en
dc.subject Emotional maturity en
dc.subject Decision making en
dc.subject Self-efficacy en
dc.subject Children with social disabilities en
dc.title The relationship between career maturity and career decision-making self-efficacy expectations among disadvantaged learners en
dc.type Thesis en

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