Hope and coping self-efficacy as predictors of psychological well-being among adolescents in Gauteng

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dc.contributor.advisor Dr. Tharina Guse en_US
dc.contributor.author January, Jillian
dc.date.accessioned 2011-12-08T10:07:06Z
dc.date.available 2011-12-08T10:07:06Z
dc.date.issued 2011-12-08
dc.date.submitted 2011-02
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10210/4234
dc.description M.A. en_US
dc.description.abstract Adolescence is stage of change on a biological, social, physical and psychological level. Whilst some individuals are able to successfully negotiate through this stage and adapt to the various changes in an adequate manner, some adolescents may encounter difficulty during this process (Geldard & Geldard, 2004). Keyes’ (2006a) has highlighted the importance of success on a developmental level during adolescence as it holds important implications for adult development. Whilst research has continually highlighted risk behaviours and negative outcomes stemming from an inadequate adaptation to the period of adolescence, there is limited information regarding the positive aspects that can further support this process of development. In addition to the developmental challenges which the stage of adolescence holds, South African youth are exposed to a unique socio-economic context, which presents challenges such as familial difficulties, lack of parental monitoring, violence, crime and exposure to abuse (Van Schalkwyk, 2009). It is therefore important to identify factors which could facilitate adolescent development in a positive manner. The aim of the current study was therefore to utilize the explanatory framework of positive psychology to understand and identify psychological strengths which could contribute to positive outcomes for adolescents. Two specific psychological strengths were explored namely hope and coping self-efficacy. The broad aim of the study was to explore hope and coping self-efficacy amongst adolescents from different population groups. Further, the study also aimed to examine the relationship between hope, coping self-efficacy and psychosocial well-being. Finally, the study aimed to determine the extent to which hope and coping self-efficacy predicted psychosocial well-being. A total number of 1173 adolescents participated in the study. Participants completed The Children’s Hope Scale (CHS), Coping Self-Efficacy Scale (CSE) and the Mental Health Continuum Short-Form (MHC-SF). Results obtained indicated that the levels of hope among adolescents from different population groups was similar and relatively high (M=24.41-26.01). Results from the CSE indicated that the mean scores for the adolescents from different population groups were in the average range. The mean scores for the different population groups were as follows: Blacks (n=376) M=78.12 SD=20.74, Whites (n=542) M=78.74, SD=20.9, Coloured (n=180) M=77.84, SD=22.98, and Indian (n=69) M=84.17 SD=21.01. In order to examine the relationship between hope, coping self-efficacy and psychosocial well-being, Pearsons’ correlations were utilised. Results indicated that a positive correlation exists between coping self-efficacy and hope (r = .574, p < 0.01 ), between coping self-efficacy and psychosocial well-being (r = .495, p < 0.01), and between hope and psychosocial well-being (r = .567, p < 0.01). Previous research suggesting positive relationships between these constructs were thus confirmed. A multiple hierarchical regression analysis was implemented to determine the extent to which hope and coping self-efficacy predicted psychosocial well-being. Results indicated that hope accounts for a significant variance in psychosocial well-being (R2 = .396, F (1, 1090) = 529.51, P < .05). Results also indicated that coping self-efficacy accounts for 7% of the variance in psychosocial well-being after controlling for hope (R2 = .396, R2 = .069, F (1, 1091, 125.35, p < .05). To conclude, the findings indicate that adolescents from different population groups have similar, relatively high levels of hope. Further, adolescents from different population groups have similar levels of coping self-efficacy. The levels of coping self-efficacy are in the average range, indicating that most adolescents in the study felt that they are able to cope with the various challenges which they need to contend with on a daily basis. A positive relationship was found between the constructs of hope, coping self-efficacy and psychosocial well-being. Coping self-efficacy also uniquely predicted psychosocial well-being after controlling for hope. The results are encouraging, as it demonstrates that despite the contextual challenges faced by many South African adolescents, they are able to cope relatively well, and hold relatively high levels of hope. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Adolescent psychology en_US
dc.subject Hope en_US
dc.subject Self-efficacy en_US
dc.subject Well-being en_US
dc.title Hope and coping self-efficacy as predictors of psychological well-being among adolescents in Gauteng en_US
dc.type Mini-Dissertation en_US

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