The comparative efficacy of attachment- versus innervation- segment chiropractic adjustments in the treatment of chronic, active rhomboid myofascial trigger point dysfunction

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dc.contributor.advisor Dr. C. Pyper; Dr. T. Hollinshead en_US
dc.contributor.author Williams, Dillon Christopher
dc.date.accessioned 2012-06-04T06:55:17Z
dc.date.available 2012-06-04T06:55:17Z
dc.date.issued 2012-06-04
dc.date.submitted 2011-03-02
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10210/4760
dc.description M. Tech. en_US
dc.description.abstract Background: No substantiated theory exists by which chiropractic adjustments are known to correct myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). Myofascial trigger points are theorized to be either a primary muscle dysfunction or a secondary manifestation to central/ peripheral neurological mechanisms. Chiropractic adjustments are theorized to exert their therapeutic influence either primarily through biomechanical effects and/ or via neurophysiological mechanisms. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of chiropractic adjustments on chronic, active rhomboid MTrPs, by comparing the clinical effects attained with rhomboid attachment-segment (C7-T5) relative to rhomboid innervation-segment (C4 and/ or C5) chiropractic adjustments. Setting: University of Johannesburg Chiropractic Day Clinic in Johannesburg, Gauteng. Participants: Thirty female subjects selected from the general population (from 18 to 40 years) were randomly divided into two different treatment groups of 15 each. Methods: The subjective information required the completion of the Subjective Pain and Discomfort Questionnaire, including the Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS). The objective measures collected were pressure-pain threshold (PPT) and range of motion measurements using the algometer and digital inclinometer, respectively. Additionally, the change in the number of active MTrPs over the treatment period was recorded. All measurements were recorded at the first, third and fifth consultations, over a 3 to 4 week period. The data gathered were then statistically analyzed with the use of a 95% confidence interval. The nonparametric Friedman and Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests were used for the intragroup comparisons, and the Mann Whitney- U test was used for the intergroup comparisons. Interventions: Treatment group 1 received upper-thoracic/ attachment- segment chiropractic adjustments, and treatment group 2 received mid-cervical/ innervation-segment chiropractic adjustments. The research project was carried out so that both groups received 5 treatment sessions over 3 to 4 weeks. Results: There were no statistically significant results obtained for intergroup comparisons. Attachment-segment chiropractic adjustments revealed statistically significant changes in NPRS values (p=0.000), PPT values (p=0.000), cervical spine right lateral flexion range (p=0.004), thoracic spine extension (p=0.005) and left rotation range (p=0.003) over time. Innervationsegment chiropractic adjustments revealed statistically significant changes in NPRS values v ii (p=0.001), cervical spine right rotation (p=0.003), thoracic spine flexion (p=0.001) right lateral flexion (p=0.001) and left rotation (p=0.005) over time. Conclusions: This study does not suggest that attachment-segment or innervation-segment chiropractic adjustments possess greater clinical efficacy relative to one another in terms of improving the clinical picture associated with chronic, active rhomboid MTrP activity. In a further study, a larger sample size will be necessary to identify subtle changes in measurement parameters. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Backache - Chiropractic treatment en_US
dc.subject Myofascial pain syndromes - Chiropractic treatment en_US
dc.subject Spinal adjustment en_US
dc.title The comparative efficacy of attachment- versus innervation- segment chiropractic adjustments in the treatment of chronic, active rhomboid myofascial trigger point dysfunction en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US

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