The retention of South African female chartered accountants in public practice

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dc.contributor.advisor Mrs. Krysta Heathcote; Dr. Anita Venter en_US
dc.contributor.author Ribeiro, Stella Procopiou
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-03T07:46:39Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-03T07:46:39Z
dc.date.issued 2012-07-03
dc.date.submitted 2012-05-23
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10210/5136
dc.description M.Comm. en_US
dc.description.abstract Orientation: Over 50% of graduates entering the Chartered Accountant (CA) profession from universities each year are women. Retention of these women in public practice, however, remains low at a mere 29%. Research purpose: This study investigates whether relationships exist between the job demands, job resources, job involvement, and turnover intentions of South African female CAs and trainee CAs in public practice audit, tax, and advisory firms in an attempt to understand what impacts their retention in public practice. Motivation for the study: International and national research suggests that there is a low retention of female CAs in public practice, as is evidenced by a low number of females CAs in management and partnership positions. An estimated shortage of 22000 skilled financial professionals, including female CAs, is expected in public practice over the next few years. This study aims to explore the turnover intentions of female CAs and trainee CAs through the relationships with their unique job demands, job resources, and job involvement, in an attempt to understand what impacts their retention in public practice. Research design: A web-based questionnaire was used in a survey that was conducted with South African female CAs and trainee CAs across the country. A total of 851 responses were received, and were analysed by means of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) to interpret the hypothesised model linkages. Main findings: This study indicates that growth opportunities and communication and participation in decision-making are related to job involvement. Job involvement is negatively related to turnover intentions, and the relationship between growth opportunities, communication and participation in decision-making, and turnover intentions are mediated by job involvement. Practical/Managerial implications: The identified job resources that impact the turnover intentions of South African female CAs and trainee CAs in public practice should be investigated and afforded the necessary attention by the management of public practice firms in order to aid the development and retention of women in theCA profession.Contribution and value add: This study adds to the empirical support for the Job Demands-Job Resources (JD-R) model. It also contributes to the CA profession by identifying those job demands and job resources that have an impact on the retention of women in public practice. Key words: female Chartered Accountants, retention, public practice, South African, job demands, job resources, job involvement, turnover intentions, CA(SA) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Women accountants en_US
dc.subject Chartered accountants en_US
dc.subject Labor turnover
dc.subject Employee retention
dc.title The retention of South African female chartered accountants in public practice en_US
dc.type Mini-Dissertation en_US

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