A tacit component to acquiring critical thinking skills? : analysing expert knowledge in order to enhance the efficiency of learning critical thinking skills

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dc.contributor.advisor Prof. H.P.P. Lotter; Prof. G.J. Rossouw en_US
dc.contributor.author Kriel, Christo Willem
dc.date.accessioned 2012-08-28T08:10:21Z
dc.date.available 2012-08-28T08:10:21Z
dc.date.issued 2012-08-28
dc.date.submitted 1999
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10210/6736
dc.description M.A. en_US
dc.description.abstract The rationale for this study is given. The rational, as explicit reasoning and knowledge, is set against the tacit dimension, and some of the implications of a tacit dimension to critical thinking skills are mentioned: Tacit knowledge: The idea of the tacit dimension is introduced as an area traditionally neglected and ignored by western philosophy and the scientific world-view, even though it has had a number of prominent advocates over the past few centuries. Two views of knowledge are identified - one emphasising a detached rational stance, the other emphasising the importance of experience in thinking and knowledge. A thought experiment: Creating a Critical Thinking Expert System: In building an expert system it is required to supply a knowledge base, an inference engine, and a user interface. It is concluded from the experiment that critical thinking cannot be mastered by merely knowing the definitions and rules - it is a skill that develops with practice. Tacit knowledge is temporarily defined as that "something extra" which the expert has, but is unable to give explicitly in his/her instructions without showing us how to do it. The expert's non-rule-following behaviour: Dreyfus and Dreyfus's five stages of becoming an expert are outlined. It is argued that, rather than being able to apply rules really quickly, the expert actually acts without following the rules. Experts simply do what normally works. The question is posed whether it is reasonable to compare the skill of the master craftsman with that of the expert thinker. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Thought and thinking - Research en_US
dc.subject Critical thinking - Research en_US
dc.subject Knowledge, Theory of - Research en_US
dc.title A tacit component to acquiring critical thinking skills? : analysing expert knowledge in order to enhance the efficiency of learning critical thinking skills en_US
dc.type Mini-Dissertation en_US

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