Comparing the effectiveness of static myofascial dry needling versus fanning dry needling in the treatment of trapezius myofascial pain syndrome

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dc.contributor.advisor Dr. C. Pyper en_US
dc.contributor.author Palm, Bryan
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-16T07:22:23Z
dc.date.available 2012-10-16T07:22:23Z
dc.date.issued 2012-10-16
dc.date.submitted 2012-10-04
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10210/7854
dc.description M.Tech. en_US
dc.description.abstract Problem Statement: Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS) is a painful and prevalent muscular condition that is characterized by the development of myofascial trigger points (TrP’s). These are locally tender when active and are able to refer pain through specific patterns to other areas of the body distal from the trigger point (Manga, 2008). Myofascial trigger points are a frequently overlooked and misunderstood source of the distressingly ever-present musculoskeletal aches and pains of mankind and many authors have found that the trapezius muscle is most often the muscle that has frequent myofascial trigger points (Travell and Simons, 1999). Much debate and discussion has arisen on the merits of the fanning dry needling technique compared to that of the static dry needling technique, but research evidence is very limited. Some practitioners prefer the static technique over the fanning technique as it reduces the presence and amount of post-needling soreness, as well as reduces the possibility of penetrating a blood vessel resulting in hemorrhaging. Other practitioners prefer the fanning technique as it increases the chances of locating the loci of the TrP, as well as increasing the chances of eliciting a local twitch response and possibly making this method more effective in deactivating a TrP than the static technique. Aim of Study: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of static myofascial dry needling to the effects of fanning myofascial dry needling of an active trigger point (TrP1) in the upper trapezius muscle in order to determine which of the two treatments is more effective with regards to decreasing neck pain and disability as well as increasing pressure pain threshold in patients with neck pain due to Trapezius Myofascial Pain Syndrome. Method: Forty participants underwent a general screening to determine whether they had active myofascial trigger points in the upper fibers of the trapezius muscle. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Myofascial pain syndrome - Chiropractic treatment en_US
dc.subject Acupuncture
dc.subject Trapezius muscle
dc.title Comparing the effectiveness of static myofascial dry needling versus fanning dry needling in the treatment of trapezius myofascial pain syndrome en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US

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