The efficacy of rehabilitation of postural and muscular imbalances in the chiropractic management of shoulder impingement syndrome in swimmers

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dc.contributor.author Richards, Jacqueline
dc.date.accessioned 2008-08-04T13:44:32Z
dc.date.available 2008-08-04T13:44:32Z
dc.date.issued 2008-08-04T13:44:32Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10210/839
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this unblinded, controlled pilot study was to compare the effectiveness of Spinal Manipulative Therapy and a shoulder rehabilitation program, focussing on improving muscular and postural imbalances, verses Spinal Manipulative Therapy alone in the treatment of sub-acute and chronic shoulder impingement syndrome found in swimmers. In executing the comparison, it was anticipated that both treatment protocols would be effective, but the combined therapy of Spinal Manipulative Therapy and rehabilitation would be the most effective in treating sub-acute and chronic shoulder impingement syndrome in swimmers. This treatment protocol focused on correcting the biomechanical dysfunction in the cervical spine and thoracic spine coupled with a rehabilitation program to stretch anterior musculature, strengthen posterior musculature and strengthen the shoulder in external rotation. These muscular and postural imbalances are a contributing factor in perpetuating the pathomechanics causing sub-acute and chronic shoulder impingement syndrome found in swimmers. Shoulder impingement syndrome of this kind in swimmers is known as Swimmer’s shoulder. Thirty swimmers between the ages of 18 and 60 with subacute and chronic shoulder pain were recruited by advertising in the local newspapers. Two groups of fifteen patients were created. Patients were randomly assigned to one of the groups as they enrolled for participation. Group A underwent Spinal Manipulative Therapy of the thoracic and cervical spines in conjunction with shoulder strengthening and postural corrective exercises. Group B underwent Spinal Manipulative Therapy of the thoracic and cervical spines. Each patient was treated nine times in three weeks. A Saunders Digital Inclinometer was used to record objective glenohumeral ranges of motion and a painful arc was determined as positive between 45 and 120 degrees. The Supraspinatus Test was performed which was recorded as positive or negative. Subjective findings were measured with the use of the Visual Analogue Pain Scale and a questionnaire modified from Athletic Shoulder Outcome Rating Scale and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons’ Shoulder Evaluation Form. Data was collected prior to the first, fourth, seventh and ninth visit. III The results indicated that both groups were effective in treating Swimmer’s shoulder. Group A showed the most positive results in terms of objective and subjective clinical findings. In conclusion, Group A (Spinal Manipulative Therapy and Rehabilitation) was the most effective treatment protocol for the management of sub-acute and chronic shoulder impingement syndrome in swimmers. This treatment protocol had a greater benefit with regard to improvement of shoulder abduction range of motion, painful arc, Supraspinatus Test and Visual Analogue Pain Scale than Group B (Spinal Manipulative Therapy only). en
dc.description.sponsorship Dr. B. Losco Dr. C. Lyons en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Chiropractic treatment of shoulder pain en
dc.title The efficacy of rehabilitation of postural and muscular imbalances in the chiropractic management of shoulder impingement syndrome in swimmers en
dc.type Thesis en

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